The system is sophisticated enough to be able to ascertain whether surrounding road users are cars, bicycles or motorbikes based on their speed and their movement patterns. Laser sensors have enabled autonomous technology to develop an understanding on the movement of vehicles around them. A fantastic example is using digital technology to improve online customer support.

  • PWC expects autonomous driving to account for 40 per cent of overall traffic within the next 12 years.
  • The most significant advantages of CFRP for use in car interiors are its high strength-to-weight ratio, ability to be worked into complex shapes, and corrosion resistance.
  • Manufacturers are in the process of developing self-driving cars on a larger scale.
  • The Nordics and the Netherlands continued to lead the way; Norway achieved 56 per cent market share, and two of the top ten best-selling cars in Holland were BEVs.3 The United Kingdom and some other countries reported triple-digit growth for the year.

Edward sits within our organic growth practice and has experience working across a spectrum of strategic automotive projects. With a background in economics, Edward has experience designing and modelling both macroeconomic- and industry-level scenarios, overlaying impacts from key technological developments and supporting the development of overarching strategic direction. COVID-19 might also prove to be a catalyst for the growth of online sales within different segments. Our COVID-19–related research shows that a fifth of consumers now plan to buy their next vehicle online . This figure is consistently higher among 18- to 34-year-olds, suggesting that Segments B, C, D and E could all demonstrate a significant jump in demand for online services. The share of new car sales taken up by EVs will vary considerably across markets .

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That’s why developing and improving autonomous technologies in cars is the future. If the increase in user interactivity and autonomous features has revealed anything, it’s that the automobile industry remains committed to the vision of the self-driving car. As autonomous systems take over, consumers will expect more user interactivity as they travel. In summary, the automotive industry is on the verge of an unprecedented transformation characterised by autonomous driving, electrification and an ever-increasing demand for personalised products that enhance the wellbeing of occupants. The industry should do more to promote critical strategies for transformation. For instance, anxiety about fields remains a real problem as the range of electric cars grows.

Cars are completing their transformation into computers on wheels and integrating new functionalities that potentially infringe a multitude of patents in various sectors. Forward looking companies may need to adopt new strategies when contracting with components makers or parties providing new technologies, and adopt innovative legal strategies to minimise the impact of the changed landscape. Technology giants like Apple, Intel and Microsoft are devoting tremendous resources toward the automotive area. For example, Intel announced that it would spend $250m on researching autonomous vehicles and earlier this year purchased Mobileye, a company with autonomous driving technology, for $15.3bn. For example, there is GasBuddy, an app which helps drivers find cheap gas, or the Spotify app that allows drivers to stream music, and apps like Google maps and Waze which are replacing in-car GPS systems.

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In 2011 and 2013, Beacon filed lawsuits against most of the major automotive manufacturers on these patents and to date has filed almost 70 infringement actions. The number of large NPEs operating in this area is only expected to increase. One study determined katespadebags.org that NPE litigation in the automotive space tripled between 2010 and 2013 and has only continued to increase since then. A number of original equipment manufacturers supplying the automakers, such as Paice, Magna and Waymo, have sued the automakers.